The Cinephiliac
Twenty-something film reviewer, social critic, and cultural analyst searching for a place in the sun.

(Source: iamrobotz, via beatnikdaddio)


Fresh (1994)

Fresh (1994): SEE IT. And have your heart break in more places than imaginable.

freshposterIn the past few months, I’ve been in the throes of working on a long-standing goal, which is to write a post about how HBO’s “The Wire” changed my life. Though I’ve been directly affected by systematic social injustices based on race and economics most of my life, “The Wire” showed me how that system continues to stay in place through a perpetual cycle of inbred mindsets and failed institutions.…

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(Source: timeisaflatcircus)


The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014)

The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014): AVOID IT. Your money is better spend going to art gallery and supported artists with a point.

grand-budapest-hotel-poster

It’s times like this when I’m aware that my overtly harsh criticisms can tend to annoy others. Many of you reading this may have seen, or will see, Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel. Of the some, a majority (according to Rotten Tomatoes) of you will love what you watched. I’m here to question, and possibly ruin, your experience, and also explain why I think The Grand Budapest Hotelis a…

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Blue is the Warmest Color (2013)

Blue is the Warmest Color (2013): SEE IT. Now, on Netflix Instant. A Beautiful tale of love and loss and all the dramas in between.

Blue_Is_the_Warmest_Color_Movie_2013When watching a film, I usually have a 120 minute cap, 125 on a good day. It’s very rare that I find myself intentionally watching a film with a run time at or over two and half hours. While I love the art of cinema, I am also a very time conscious person who at any given moment would rather devote my time to multitasking on other projects; like googleing sacred geometry and INTJ personality…

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manabuttdev:

Taking the afternoon off of Joute stuff, so I’m doing something I’ve been wanting to for a while.
Re-interpreting this: (still very much a WIP)

manabuttdev:

Taking the afternoon off of Joute stuff, so I’m doing something I’ve been wanting to for a while.

Re-interpreting this: (still very much a WIP)



Mamoru Hosoda’s Summer Wars began as an olive branch between me and my guy. In my desire to get the creeps by watching a horror film on a Saturday night, I had to compromise and watch an anime first. Slightly unenthusiastic sighs escaped us both upon initially agreeing to our respective deals. Fortunately, Summer Wars’ entrenchment in Japanese culture and philosophy not only stimulated my brain with basic insights, but it also implanted new ideas and theories for my over-active mind to mill over in the ongoing days.

Basking in the throws of puberty, Kenji, a math whiz and part-time moderator of the socio-economically involved Facebook/Google of Japan, OZ, is convinced to take a break from work by his crush Natsuki who needs a favor. Kenji soon discovers the favor is passing as Natsuki’s boyfriend on her grandmother’s 90th birthday. What begins as an innocent white lie soon takes a turn in unbelievable reality when Kenji’s math skills involves him with a mysterious online hacker who finds a way to shake up OZ and those dependent on its system.

Summer Wars is phenomenal. It’s a whirlwind of colors and animated textures that place you directly in its subtransient future where the spirits of John Lennon and Yoko Ono are the gatekeepers. It makes a venomous villain out of a concept as the hacker’s tampering begins to affect traffic, water flow, distress signals, and space probs; a concept not far removed from our own technological advancements. Summer Wars in turn becomes an extremely complex tale of the battle between good and evil by muddling the details with simple human error, technological growth, and the will to survive. While Summer Wars has a tendency to vere off from its action at times with overblown, dramatic situations, it stands as an impressive film that I highly recommend seeing.

 

Recommendation: Summer Wars (2009) Mamoru Hosoda’s Summer Wars began as an olive branch between me and my guy. In my desire to get the creeps by watching a horror film on a Saturday night, I had to compromise and watch an anime first.

fuckindiva:

George Harrison self-portrait in India, 1966


Beatle selfie

fuckindiva:

George Harrison self-portrait in India, 1966

Beatle selfie

(via pixelatedboobs)


beatnikdaddio:

the game’s ON!
let’s go CARDS!

beatnikdaddio:

the game’s ON!
let’s go CARDS!

(Source: honey-rider)


But Wait, There’s More!

But Wait, There’s More!

Did you know that I also contribute reviews to two other equally amazing websites? You didn’t? Well then today just got a little bit more interesting. 

Over at Pretty Clever Films our focus is on classic, art-house, and documentary films

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And at Movie Boozer our goal is getting balls to the wall drunk while watching movies of all genres! It’s a win-win.

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sweetjanespopboutique:

Paul McCartney illustration by Alan Aldridge, which appeared on the cover of the Observer magazine, November 1967. Image scanned by Sweet Jane,

sweetjanespopboutique:

Paul McCartney illustration by Alan Aldridge, which appeared on the cover of the Observer magazine, November 1967. Image scanned by Sweet Jane,

(via beatnikdaddio)


The Act of Killing (2012)

The Act of Killing (2012)

the act of killing poster

For the past three months, the Oscar nominated documentary, The Act of Killing,has been recommended to me more times that I can recall. Of all the people who’ve thrown the title in my direction, not a single one discussed what the film was about or how it affected them afterwards. Instead, I was repeatedly informed of Werner Herzog and famed documentarian Errol Morris’ close ties with the…

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My Spiritual Awakening with Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust (1991)

My Spiritual Awakening with Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust (1991)

daughters-of-the-dustAuthentic representation of black culture in cinema has been a work in progress since the birth of motion of pictures. The turn of the 20th century gave birth to black-owned production company’s combating against the one-dimensional stereotypes that littered the screens at the time. Unfortunately, the impending Depression and growth of the studio system folded virtually every black-owned company…

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